Tag Archives: Kindness

#365PictureBooks Day 34 -Hooray for hat!

Elephant wakes up grumpy—until ding, dong! What’s in the surprise box at the front door? A hat! HOORAY FOR HAT! Elephant marches off to show Zebra, but Zebra is having a grumpy day, too—until Elephant shares his new hat and cheers up his friend. Off they march to show Turtle! The parade continues as every animal brightens the day of a grumpy friend. An irresistible celebration of friendship, sharing, and fabulous hats“. Publisher.

When Elephant woke up, he was very grumpy…and so starts this lovely tale about gratefully and graciously receiving acts of kindness and paying the kindness forward. The author/illustrator is obviously an accomplished designer as the balance between the clever graphics and lots of white space on each page is perfect. The colours of the exuberant hats and the corresponding “Hooray for Hat!” are in gorgeous colour in contrast to the more slightly more realistic and natural tones of the animals. The book is not sombre in tone – even the animals are crisply evident against the white.

The book is a delight and has a freshness that is sure to charm anyone who has the pleasure of reading it.

Author website with activity kit

 Bibliographic details:

Hooray for hat! / Words and pictures by Brian Won.

Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014.

ISBN:9780544159037

#365PictureBooks Day 21 The invisible boy

Meet Brian, the invisible boy. Nobody ever seems to notice him or think to include him in their group, game, or birthday party . . . until, that is, a new kid comes to class. When Justin, the new boy, arrives, Brian is the first to make him feel welcome. And when Brian and Justin team up to work on a class project together, Brian finds a way to shine.

From esteemed author and speaker Trudy Ludwig and acclaimed illustrator Patrice Barton, this gentle story shows how small acts of kindness can help children feel included and allow them to flourish. Any parent, teacher, or counselor looking for material that sensitively addresses the needs of quieter children will find The Invisible Boy a valuable and important resource.

Includes backmatter with discussion questions and resources for further reading”. Publisher: Random House

I found my heart breaking a little when I read this book. Brian, is the invisible boy in this story. He is invisible because he is not even noticed by his classmates or teacher. The children who are noticed, are the loud, the demanding, the whining and the complaining children that seem to demand and get all the attention. Brian is flying ‘under the radar’. Brian’s invisibility is represented by his pale grey pencil drawn image on the pages when everyone else is drawn in colour. There are pages where we see Brian getting pleasure from his drawing and his images of dragons and superheroes are very revealing about his desire for friendship and acceptance. As Brian is introduced to another new boy a little colour fills his face and as he begins to make friends with Justin and collaborate with his peers he is gradually drawn using full colour too.

This would be a wonderful book to share with students at the start of the school year or at any time when issues arise. It is a salient reminder for all the popular kids to see things from the POV of the quiet, the shy and the introverted. This book really reinforces the importance of kindness. Heartily recommended for all school libraries.

Author website: Trudy Ludwig

Bibliographic details:

The invisible boy  /  by Trudy Ludwig ; illustrated by Patrice Barton.

Published by Random House, 2013.

32 pages.

ISBN:9781582464503

NZ RRP $33.50

Available from library suppliers, good independent bookshops or borrow from Auckland Libraries

A very special picture book….”Extra yarn” by Mac Barnett illustrated by Jon Klassen

Image

Extra yarn written by Mac Barnett, Illustrated by Jon Klassen. Published by Balzer + Bray, 2012. Hardback, 40 pages.

Extra Yarn, winner of a Caldecott Honor 2013 and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, as well as a New York Times bestseller, is the story of how a young girl and her box of magical yarn transform a community.

Starred review from Booklist.org:

“This picture book is certain to spark the imagination of every child who comes upon it, and what could be better than that? Annabelle lives in a black-and-white world, where everything is drab, drab, drab. So imagine her surprise when she finds a box filled with yarn of every color. Armed with the yarn and knitting needles, she makes herself a sweater, but when she finishes, she finds that she has extra yarn left over. After knitting a sweater for her dog, her classmates, and various (hilariously unsurprised) bunnies and bears, she still has extra yarn. So, Annabelle turns her attention to things that don’t usually wear wool cozies: houses and cars and mailboxes. Soon an evil archduke with a sinister mustache “who was very fond of clothes” hears about the magic box of never-ending yarn, and he wants it for his own. Reading like a droll fairy tale, this Barnett-Klassen collaboration is both seamless and magical. The spare, elegant text and art are also infused with plenty of deadpan humor. Klassen (I Want My Hat Back, 2011) uses ink, gouache, and digital illustration to fashion Annabelle’s world out of geometric shapes, set against dark, saturated pages, and against white as the town comes to colorful, stitched life. Quirky and wonderful, this story quietly celebrates a child’s ingenuity and her ability to change the world around her.”

Our read aloud of this book:

This is a picture book I purchased and gifted to our Library on International Book Giving Day, after hearing so much about it from other librarians and teachers in the international ‘book-lovin-blogger-twitter-verse’. I felt after reading it that it was very special. After reading it aloud to classes from Preschool – Year 4, I am convinced my initial feeling was absolutely ‘spot-on’ and that it is very special indeed.

This is one of those picture books that seems to engage all listeners regardless of age. I usually have a few fidgeters in my read alouds, as I have some children who have English as a second language and others that have limited experience of being ‘read aloud to’, and who find it difficult to sit still and actively listen. Reading this book engaged those hard to reach children.

As the knitting is gradually added to Annabelles world,  the splashes of colour really pop against the  black, brown and grey tones on a white background of the early illustrations and even children sitting towards the back of the group were able to enjoy the pictures.

What I loved about the story is how many links there were between the text and ideas portrayed in the story and units of inquiry that my students are currently exploring in the classroom as part of the PYP: (Year 5 : How we express ourselves (uniqueness) Year 2 : Where we are in place and time (change) ; Kindergarten, Y1 & Y2 & Y3 : Who we are (friendships) etc…

Important themes in the book: Community (bringing people together, connections, sharing), bullying/kindness, creativity and the visual arts, change – adding color, bringing happiness. The story feels like a modern fairy tale.

The read aloud led to a lively discussion about the story and possible explanations for how the yarn disappeared for the archduke and reappeared for Annabelle;  but also modern concepts such as yarn bombing and  guerilla knitting

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story to my students, I loved how they sat either transfixed, or laughing out loud, and how their faces showed that their natural curiosity was piqued. Reading this story has reinforced my belief in the power of the picture book for all ages.

Teacher resources:

  • http://classroombookshelf.blogspot.co.nz/2012/10/extra-yarn.html . This comprehensive article elaborates on some of the points I have only had time to touch on. The article is divided into three sections: Book Review, Teaching Invitations (Grades K-2: The power of the refrain; Insights into bullying; creating with yarn. Grades 3 and up: Illustrations as metaphors; Genre study (Folklore) Mentor Text for Writing with Purpose; Light and Darkness in Illustrations;  Community Transformations. Critical literacy:  The Question of “Selling Out”). Further Explorations (Online resources i.e. author/illustrator websites, craft websites, folklore websites; Books: other titles that have artistic or literary similarities to this one, or those that could be used to convey similar messages).

Media resources:

Browse inside the book at the Harper Collins Childrens website here:

Book trailer made by a Library Studies student:

Mac Barnett: Reading part of Extra Yarn aloud (video uploaded to YouTube by abeecher930)

A story to capture your heart and never let it go… ‘The One and only Ivan’

It is almost impossible to describe the impact this book has on everyone that reads it.

“Humans waste words. They toss them like banana peels and leave them to rot. Everyone knows the peels are the best part.” 

alt=one and only ivan applegate cover

The one and only Ivan by Katherine Applegate, Published by Harper Collins, 2012. Available in NZ bookstores in the PB edition pictured here, rrp.$18.99

From the publisher:

Ivan is an easygoing gorilla. Living at the Exit 8 Big Top Mall and Video Arcade, he has grown accustomed to humans watching him through the glass walls of his domain. He rarely misses his life in the jungle. In fact, he hardly ever thinks about it at all.

Instead, Ivan thinks about TV shows he’s seen and about his friends Stella, an elderly elephant, and Bob, a stray dog. But mostly Ivan thinks about art and how to capture the taste of a mango or the sound of leaves with color and a well-placed line.

Then he meets Ruby, a baby elephant taken from her family, and she makes Ivan see their home—and his own art—through new eyes. When Ruby arrives, change comes with her, and it’s up to Ivan to make it a change for the better.

Katherine Applegate blends humor and poignancy to create Ivan’s unforgettable first-person narration in a story of friendship, art, and hope.

Book trailer:

Reviews and praise:

Kirkus Reviews (starred review): “How Ivan confronts his harrowing past yet stays true to his nature exemplifies everything youngsters need to know about courage. … Utterly believable, this bittersweet story, complete with an author’s note identifying the real Ivan, will inspire a new generation of advocates.”

Gary D. Schmidt “This book will break your heart—and then, against all odds, mend it again.”

Source: Author Website

What do I think about this book?

Another book I am reviewing and recommending late in the piece. Like Wonder by R.J. Palacio, I am hoping this book wins a Newbery Honor if not the Newbery Medal (announced January 28th 2013).

I challenge anyone young or old to read this and not see animals in captivity in a new light.

The One and Only Ivan is a work of fiction, but the inspiration for this imagined tale lies with a true story. Ivan, a real gorilla, lived at Zoo Atlanta, but on the way to that happy ending, he spent almost three decades without seeing another of his own kind before being moved to Zoo Atlanta in 1994.” Katherine Applegate

The story is told by Ivan from his point of view. I love the way the author captured the way an intelligent creature might see humans (his captors) and how he would rationalise his captivity. We come to really understand him, where he came from and who he is.  The way he rises above his own struggle for survival in order to help the baby elephant Ruby is a lesson for all children in understanding empathy, caring, kindness, hope and love.

This is a beautiful and moving narrative and is powerful as a read aloud. Useful for teaching both narrative and simile. Chapters are mainly short with lots of white space giving the book an airy poetic feel. The structure and layout is great for reluctant readers who struggle with too much text.

Highly and heartily recommended for Year 5-Year 8. Copies in both our Junior Library and Middle Senior too.  (From Year 4 or 8 years old as a read aloud with lots of discussion and tissues!)

Author website:

http://theoneandonlyivan.com/book/

Teacher’s resources:

http://files.harpercollins.com/HCChildrens/OMM/Media/OneAndOnlyIvan_DG_4.pdf

Extra Ivan goodness :

Interview with Katherine Applegate (Publisher’s weekly) about how the story of the ‘Real Ivan’ was Katherine’s inspiration: http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/authors/interviews/article/49777-q-a-with-katherine-applegate.html

Teachers – see this moving video by wonderful 4th Grade teacher Colby Sharp – I love how he talks about how this book affected his students. This is a teacher passionate about books and reading! Link to Mr Sharp’s blog here

Quotes from the book (Compiled at Goodreads) can be found here

RELATED POST:

Don’t judge a boy by his face… ‘Wonder’ by R.J. Palacio

A book that has made a huge impact since it’s debut and release in early 2012 – I think it is a stimulating story for teaching about the PYP attitude ‘Empathy’ and encouraging Kindness. This is a powerful narrative – brilliant for reading aloud.

wonder-cover

Wonder by R.J. Palacio, Published by Random House, 2012. Paperback available in NZ book stores rrp: $19.99

Synopsis:

August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. He’s about to start 5th grade at Beecher Prep, and if you’ve ever been the new kid then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances?

Reviews & Praise (source author website):

Kirkus Reviews December 2011: “After being homeschooled for years, Auggie Pullman is about to start fifth grade, but he’s worried: How will he fit into middle-school life when he looks so different from everyone else?”

“Palacio divides the novel into eight parts, interspersing Auggie’s first-person narrative with the voices of family members and classmates, wisely expanding the story beyond Auggie’s viewpoint and demonstrating that Auggie’s arrival at school doesn’t test only him, it affects everyone in the community. Auggie may be finding his place in the world, but that world must find a way to make room for him, too. A memorable story of kindness, courage and wonder.”

Publisher’s weekly: “…Though he has some expectedly horrible experiences at school, Auggie has lucked out with the adults in his life–his parents love him unconditionally, and his principal and teachers value kindness over all other qualities. While one bully manages, temporarily, to turn most of Auggie’s classmates against him (Auggie likens this to becoming the human equivalent of “the Cheese Touch,” a clever Diary of a Wimpy Kid reference), good wins out. Few first novels pack more of a punch: it’s a rare story with the power to open eyes–and hearts–to what it’s like to be singled out for a difference you can’t control, when all you want is to be just another face in the crowd. “ 

Book trailer:

Author interview:  R.J. Palacio talks about her inspiration and has some ideas for teachers wanting to use the book trailer as a provocation for discussion:

What do I think about this book?

I am rather late highlighting this book – when it came out last year I wasn’t working as a children’s librarian and I hadn’t started this blog. I read it late last year as a copy was held in the Middle School section of my library. Recently my family listened to the audio book as we made a road trip around the South Island of New Zealand. I was incredibly moved by the book when I read it and again, as my whole family aged 10-49 were enthralled by the story (there were times we all had tears rolling down our cheeks – the next minute we would be laughing out loud). It is both sad and uplifting at the same time – and the author never lets things get too maudlin, the sadness is tempered with just the right amount of humor. This is one of those memorable stories that stays with you weeks and months after reading it, probably for life!

‘Choose Kind’ will be the focus of the first Library display I make this year. I would love to inspire all my students to start the year thinking about others and how to treat everyone in their lives, and everyone they meet, with kindness and caring. This book has a powerful anti-bullying message. Recommended for ages 9/10 through to adult!

CHOOSE KIND CAMPAIGN:

Blog at Tumblr

Teacher resources:

http://www.randomhouse.com/teachers/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Wonder_EG_WEB.pdfReviews:

Teach mentor texts post on Wonder: http://www.teachmentortexts.com/2012/04/wonder.html#axzz1rpDrD0mC

Author website for RJ Palaciowww.http://rjpalacio.com