Tag Archives: Award winners

Three times lucky by Sheila Turnage

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Three times lucky by Sheila Turnage.
Hardcover, 312 pages
Published 2012 by Dial
(ISBN13: 9780803736702)

Newbery honor winner and New York Times bestseller.

From the publisher:

A hilarious Southern debut with the kind of characters you meet once in a lifetime

Rising sixth grader Miss Moses LoBeau lives in the small town of Tupelo Landing, NC, where everyone’s business is fair game and no secret is sacred. She washed ashore in a hurricane eleven years ago, and she’s been making waves ever since. Although Mo hopes someday to find her “upstream mother,” she’s found a home with the Colonel–a café owner with a forgotten past of his own–and Miss Lana, the fabulous café hostess. She will protect those she loves with every bit of her strong will and tough attitude. So when a lawman comes to town asking about a murder, Mo and her best friend, Dale Earnhardt Johnson III, set out to uncover the truth in hopes of saving the only family Mo has ever known.

Full of wisdom, humor, and grit, this timeless yarn will melt the heart of even the sternest Yankee.

What did I think about this book?

Loved it! Highly recommended – This will be good for my mature readers who can decipher the southern voice and writing. Suggested age range 10-12. This should be a wonderful read aloud that would lead to a lot of interesting and lively discussion about the characters, the setting and some of the issues – murder, bank robbery, domestic abuse, and small town snobbery. It is interesting to think that despite the differences in geography ‘small town USA’ is probably very much like ‘small town anywhere’ – including New Zealand provincial towns – and most readers will relate to many of the eccentric and downright nasty characters we meet in the book.

My favourite quote:

“I’m Baptist. So far, Fast or Never is the only speeds I got with forgiving.”

Listen to an audio extract from the first chapter HERE :

Reviews:

Review by Betsy Bird: “the one thing I can say with certainty about Three Times Lucky is that you will never, but ever, mistake it for another book. We’ve got murder. We’ve got careening racecars. We’ve got drunken louts and amnesia and wigs and karate and all sorts of good stuff rolled up in one neat little package. I’ve read a lot of mysteries for kids this year and truth be told? This one’s my favorite, hands down.”

Kirkus reviews: “What do you get when you combine Because of Winn-Dixie’s heart with the mystery and action of Holes? You get an engaging, spirit-lifting and unforgettable debut for young readers.”

Allyson Beecher: “It might be easy to dismiss this story as just another one of those books that portray all Southerners as backwards, ignorant, and foolish…Educators should take heed in that if the only books we shared with students were stories about poor, ignorant Southerners living in small towns, then we too would be “in danger of a single story”.  However, there are Southerners (just like there are northerners) that live in small towns filled with eccentric, quirky characters.  Our responsibility as educators and reading leaders is to provide students with a rich variety that represents all types of people living in a specific region or during a designated time period.”

A very special picture book….”Extra yarn” by Mac Barnett illustrated by Jon Klassen

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Extra yarn written by Mac Barnett, Illustrated by Jon Klassen. Published by Balzer + Bray, 2012. Hardback, 40 pages.

Extra Yarn, winner of a Caldecott Honor 2013 and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, as well as a New York Times bestseller, is the story of how a young girl and her box of magical yarn transform a community.

Starred review from Booklist.org:

“This picture book is certain to spark the imagination of every child who comes upon it, and what could be better than that? Annabelle lives in a black-and-white world, where everything is drab, drab, drab. So imagine her surprise when she finds a box filled with yarn of every color. Armed with the yarn and knitting needles, she makes herself a sweater, but when she finishes, she finds that she has extra yarn left over. After knitting a sweater for her dog, her classmates, and various (hilariously unsurprised) bunnies and bears, she still has extra yarn. So, Annabelle turns her attention to things that don’t usually wear wool cozies: houses and cars and mailboxes. Soon an evil archduke with a sinister mustache “who was very fond of clothes” hears about the magic box of never-ending yarn, and he wants it for his own. Reading like a droll fairy tale, this Barnett-Klassen collaboration is both seamless and magical. The spare, elegant text and art are also infused with plenty of deadpan humor. Klassen (I Want My Hat Back, 2011) uses ink, gouache, and digital illustration to fashion Annabelle’s world out of geometric shapes, set against dark, saturated pages, and against white as the town comes to colorful, stitched life. Quirky and wonderful, this story quietly celebrates a child’s ingenuity and her ability to change the world around her.”

Our read aloud of this book:

This is a picture book I purchased and gifted to our Library on International Book Giving Day, after hearing so much about it from other librarians and teachers in the international ‘book-lovin-blogger-twitter-verse’. I felt after reading it that it was very special. After reading it aloud to classes from Preschool – Year 4, I am convinced my initial feeling was absolutely ‘spot-on’ and that it is very special indeed.

This is one of those picture books that seems to engage all listeners regardless of age. I usually have a few fidgeters in my read alouds, as I have some children who have English as a second language and others that have limited experience of being ‘read aloud to’, and who find it difficult to sit still and actively listen. Reading this book engaged those hard to reach children.

As the knitting is gradually added to Annabelles world,  the splashes of colour really pop against the  black, brown and grey tones on a white background of the early illustrations and even children sitting towards the back of the group were able to enjoy the pictures.

What I loved about the story is how many links there were between the text and ideas portrayed in the story and units of inquiry that my students are currently exploring in the classroom as part of the PYP: (Year 5 : How we express ourselves (uniqueness) Year 2 : Where we are in place and time (change) ; Kindergarten, Y1 & Y2 & Y3 : Who we are (friendships) etc…

Important themes in the book: Community (bringing people together, connections, sharing), bullying/kindness, creativity and the visual arts, change – adding color, bringing happiness. The story feels like a modern fairy tale.

The read aloud led to a lively discussion about the story and possible explanations for how the yarn disappeared for the archduke and reappeared for Annabelle;  but also modern concepts such as yarn bombing and  guerilla knitting

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story to my students, I loved how they sat either transfixed, or laughing out loud, and how their faces showed that their natural curiosity was piqued. Reading this story has reinforced my belief in the power of the picture book for all ages.

Teacher resources:

  • http://classroombookshelf.blogspot.co.nz/2012/10/extra-yarn.html . This comprehensive article elaborates on some of the points I have only had time to touch on. The article is divided into three sections: Book Review, Teaching Invitations (Grades K-2: The power of the refrain; Insights into bullying; creating with yarn. Grades 3 and up: Illustrations as metaphors; Genre study (Folklore) Mentor Text for Writing with Purpose; Light and Darkness in Illustrations;  Community Transformations. Critical literacy:  The Question of “Selling Out”). Further Explorations (Online resources i.e. author/illustrator websites, craft websites, folklore websites; Books: other titles that have artistic or literary similarities to this one, or those that could be used to convey similar messages).

Media resources:

Browse inside the book at the Harper Collins Childrens website here:

Book trailer made by a Library Studies student:

Mac Barnett: Reading part of Extra Yarn aloud (video uploaded to YouTube by abeecher930)